Scottsdale Home Inspections

 

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When looking to buy or sell a house, you will absolutely be dealing with home inspection. However, there are not only many misconceptions about home appraisal, but there is also confusion about how to properly utilize a home inspector’s services, when they can be employed, and what you should expect from a competent home inspector.

First, when dealing with a home inspection, you should know what they will be looking for. Depending on the structure and the records of the house, home inspectors will look at many of the various components of the property. Here are some of the things a home inspector will look at.

The Foundation. One of the most basic elements of a home inspection is ensuring that the structure is sound. A solid foundation, as well as proper framing atop it should all be features which will stand up to weather and time. No one wants a house that could collapse.
The Roof and Exterior. A home inspection should examine exterior features of the house such as trim, siding, and look for external damage. Also, home inspectors will look at the condition of the roof, in the hope that your home will not have unknown leaks. Ideally, a home inspector will be able to get information about the age and lifespan of the roof.
Plumbing and Electrical. Ensuring that all of the houses systems are operational is also critical. Faulty electrical systems cause headache when trying to live in a house but can also be a serious fire risk. Plumbing problems can cause water damage, which could cause structural issues necessitating expensive repairs over time.
General Condition of the house. Things like exterior and internal damage, heating systems, ducts, water damage, and the condition of various areas of the house are all important things to know before you purchase a home.
With this understanding of what the home inspector will be looking at, you should also be aware of a few other things. The first is ensuring that you, as a buyer, have located a reputable and licensed home inspector. Do not use an inspector affiliated with the seller or someone else involved in the sale. If you have reliable and recent service records, it can be ok to not pay for certain inspection services, but make sure you are following all local laws and regulations. Just remember, you are paying for peace of mind that the potentially largest investment you ever make will not turn into a loss.

During a Scottsdale home inspection, it’s not unusual for issues to arise which need repair or replacing. Many times, it can mean a return to the negotiating table so the buyer and seller can hammer out the details of who’s going to fix what – or how much of a credit the seller is planning to give the buyer. When a home inspection discovers items needing to be addressed, consider these three tips to negotiate repairs.

Ask the seller to give you a credit for the cost of the work to be performed. There are several reasons for asking for a credit rather than having the seller have the required work done. First and foremost, the seller has likely lost interest in performing work on the home, regardless of the findings of your Scottsdale home inspection. After all, the contract is signed and even though there are issues pending that need to be negotiated, most sellers are too focused on buying and moving into their next home. Secondly, if you can get the seller to give you a credit against the sales price you can use that additional savings to have the work done yourself – with you being the new homeowner and with the work being done to your satisfaction. Thirdly, with a credit at closing the issue of repairing or replacing certain items falls squarely on your shoulders, keeping it simple and not involving the seller to ensure the work was being done.

Keep these items in mind as you prepare to negotiate after your XXX home inspection report.

Consider long-range planning. Keep future repairs or renovations in mind when negotiating with the seller. For example, if there are water stains on the ceiling that occurred as a result of a leak, ask the seller for a credit to repair both the leak and repainting or repairing the ceiling. You may elect to repair the leak, but put off fixing the stain until later – especially if you know you’re going to replace the existing stippled ceilings with a smoother treatment. Keep those and other items in mind as you prepare to negotiate on the heels of your Scottsdale home inspection report.

Don’t let others “see your hand.” In a card game, it’s important not to let others see your cards because it will give them an unfair advantage and change the way they play the game. Use the same strategy during your Scottsdale home inspection. If you say too much to the listing agent about your likes and dislikes or about your plans for decorating certain rooms and how excited you are, you could lose your negotiating power. The listing agent may tell the seller, and it could affect the outcome of the credit they were thinking about giving you. For example, if you tell the listing agent you plan to completely re-do the entire kitchen, the seller may find out about it and be less inclined to give you a credit for repairing the kitchen cabinets or replacing a dishwasher. Don’t reveal your plans. Keep a “poker face.”

It’s probably good to mention here that you should always insist the sales contract be contingent on the home “passing inspection” by way of a Scottsdale home inspection report showing no discernible repairs that should be made. If you don't include that in the contract and make the assumption you can always come back and revisit or negotiate certain issues after the inspection, you may be unpleasantly surprised.

In the event the property inspection is completed without any mention of needed repairs or other shortcomings, that's good. There’s no reason for further negotiating. However, if there are items that need to be addressed and the contract doesn’t mention what to do in such a case, you’ve lost your negotiating power and may force the seller to consider other offers or back-up contracts if you elect not to move forward.

With that in mind, enter into the closing with a full awareness of what can happen. In the sports world the old saying, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over” means anything can happen while the game is still going on. It’s the same in the real estate world – a deal isn’t completed until the money goes from the buyer to the seller and the deed to the property is transferred properly. The lesson here is: “Be alert, stay on your toes and keep your eyes wide open.” Anything less than that and you run the risk of losing your negotiating advantage and making your home buying experience less than what it could be.

Don’t give “buyer’s remorse” any opportunity to enter the picture. Be happy and satisfied with your purchase. You’ll enjoy it that much more!

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home inspections in the Scottsdale Home Inspections section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

Scottsdale home inspection facts will always be a topic of discussion in real estate circles. Home inspections are likely to remain in steady demand as the real estate market is expected to continue to be relatively good in 2017. Home inspections are, of course, a valuable tool in assisting buyers in making informed, educated decisions about a house they’re considering purchasing.

Home inspections provide a great deal of valuable information about the overall condition of a home. In addition, the inspection will assess those areas that may require both small and large repairs, as well as any visual issues that may affect the structural components of the house. As with any subjective art or science, the home inspection industry is often victim to a wide variety of myths and misconceptions. Let’s take a look at some of the more prevalent myths and see if we can separate fiction from the Scottsdale home inspection facts.

Understanding Scottsdale home inspection facts is vital to the housing industry.

Myth: The home inspection report will contain everything I will need to know about the house I’m going to purchase.

Fact: The home inspection report will include a good deal of information about your home. However, prospective homeowners are encouraged to accompany home inspectors as they inspect the home. Having the potential new homeowner present will give them the advantage of observing and hearing first-hand what the inspector sees and thinks about the home’s condition. In addition, an inspector will usually give the homeowner suggestions and advice on the maintenance of many areas of the home.

Myth: A real estate appraisal is essentially the equivalent to a home inspection and is just as thorough.

Fact: An appraisal and a home inspection aren’t the same thing, nor do they set out to determine the same results. There’s a reason both an appraisal and a home inspection report are required by most lenders on real estate transactions – and the reason is they are two entirely different processes. An appraisal is a determination of the fair market value of a home or other piece of real estate. Utilizing Scottsdale home inspection facts can determine the condition of a home and its component parts – plumbing systems, electrical systems, roofs and floors, etc. – which, of course, may affect the home’s value, but the inspection report is more concerned with the home’s actual condition.

Myth: A home inspector can let me know everything that can maybe go wrong with the house I’m thinking about buying.

Fact: While a home inspector is obligated to list in his report items that aren’t working properly or efficiently, he has no way of knowing when certain systems or components will fail. The inspector can only observe the functions of various aspects of the home at the time of the inspection. For example, the home inspector may cite that a home will need a new roof within the next 3-5 years. However, if conditions deteriorate more rapidly than that, a prospective homeowner may find he needs a new roof in less time than was originally estimated. In addition, as has been said of home inspectors in an effort to explain what they can see and can’t see, inspectors aren’t equipped with x-ray vision and can’t see through walls, floors, brick, wood, or concrete. Inspectors can only report on what they view at a particular point in time with a trained eye knowing what to look for. One last thought regarding a home inspection: Read your inspection contract. Some agreements don’t include such items like pest inspection and septic tank failure. These could likely be extras that aren’t part of a standard contract. So, if you're confused or have a question as to what’s covered and what’s not, ask your home inspector to explain it to you – and show it to you in writing.

Myth: All home inspectors are licensed and qualified. Plus, my home inspector says he’s certified, so I should be safe, right?

Fact: Licensing for home inspectors is only required in 30 states throughout the United States. In addition, even inspectors who are licensed will have varying degrees of qualifications. While some home inspectors receive their job training and certification via a variety of related programs and educational offerings, certification does not always equate to competency, and certification is not guarantee that an inspector is fully trained. Some home inspectors receive their training from online courses – having never completed an on-site field inspection, nor passed a comprehensive test for home inspection knowledge. While technically they may have received a certification, they clearly aren't as field-tested as other inspectors may be.

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) has taken steps designed to set certain standards for performance for its members. ASHI has several levels of certification and offers full certification to those inspectors who have completed a minimum of 250 home inspections and have passed a comprehensive examination. If you want to know more about your home inspector’s qualifications and just how much he knows about Scottsdale home inspection facts, have an in-depth discussion with him. Ask about his training and field experience. It’s also a good idea to ask for a sample of a typical home inspection report so you can see firsthand how thorough the report will be.

Knowing more about the home inspection process and the people that provide the service will give you greater awareness and confidence in the results of the report. In addition to the peace of mind, you’ll likely be more prone to accept and understand the inspector’s findings about the house you’re contemplating buying.

Be on the lookout for these and other myths to distinguish from Scottsdale home inspection facts. They are great for providing a certain amount of information about a home. Just make sure you understand what that information is and what is being reported, recommended and observed by the home inspector.

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home inspections in the Scottsdale Home Inspections section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

Scottsdale home inspection tips like the ones found in this article could save you a ton of money. A home inspection is but one of the many expenses a homebuyer will face during the home shopping process. None is more critical – and potentially satisfying – than a home inspection. Experts say on a dollar for dollar comparison, a home inspection represents the wisest investment you can make regarding the home you’re considering purchasing. A thorough home inspection will examine and summarize your home’s good points and bad, giving you necessary insight to know how to proceed with the sales transaction.

Let’s take a look at Five Scottsdale Home Inspection Tips worth considering.

Choose the right type of inspection

 Among our many Scottsdale home inspection tips, if you opt to perform any repair work yourself, read this first.

Once you meet with your real estate agent to submit an offer to buy the home you like, your agent should cover the various types of inspections from which to choose. In addition to a standard home inspection there are others such as pest, radon and mold inspections.

Standard home inspections can be categorized into two different types:  The home inspection and the general inspection. While it may sound like nothing more than semantics, there are differences in the two – primarily in the manner in which the information reported by the inspection is utilized. A typical home inspection is the more popular option. In that report, the home seller will receive a notice from the prospective purchaser outlining certain specific items that need to be repaired prior to the closing of the sale. In addition, the notice will ask the seller to consider paying for the repairs by way of a credit toward the closing costs of the transaction.

Second on our list of five Scottsdale home inspection tips includes getting a general inspection, which is solely for informational purposes. It stops short of requesting that inspected issues be corrected or repaired – but it does provide the prospective homebuyer the option to refuse to close the sale based on the inspection’s findings.

Choose a qualified inspector In scheduling, conducting and following up with a home inspection it’s important that each participant in the process is experienced and highly qualified. The potential purchase of the home you’re interested in represents one of the largest financial investments you’ll ever make – and it’s important that you and the people you surround yourself with treat it as such. Select a home inspection expert that is currently licensed by, and is a member of, a well-known trade association such as the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) or the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI.) In addition, have the home inspector share a copy of the sample inspection report. Of course, you will ultimately obtain the entire report and its findings, but seeing a blank report ahead of time will give you a clearer picture of what to expect and how you can use the information in a potential negotiation with the home seller. In the end, the home inspector will give you a detailed list of the home’s components and their overall condition. Home inspectors recommend taking notes during the inspection recap – especially if you have questions regarding the use and maintenance of items such as home systems and appliances you’re not fully familiar with.

Where’s the owner’s manual? Funny thing about homes – they rarely come equipped with an owner’s manual. Among our Scottsdale home inspection tips is the advice of many experts which recommends you accompany the home inspector while he’s conducting the inspection. He will be able to provide a good deal of information on how certain systems in the home operate. This will be invaluable at a later date should you decide to purchase the home.

Use the report for the purpose intended Among our Scottsdale home inspection tips, when your home inspection professional has examined the home and has issued his findings in the report, review it closely. Ask questions as needed. Don’t be bashful and don’t be afraid of asking the proverbial “stupid” questions – there are none when you’re making a purchase of this size. Keep in mind that the home inspector’s role is that of a “generalist” to some degree, and less of a specialist regarding certain areas or findings. As an example, if the inspector finds possible evidence of a mold issue, he will likely recommend that you contact a company specializing in mold remediation to solve the problem.

While negotiations with the seller vary widely according to the results of a home inspection, there are normal guidelines and protocol that are usually followed. Major issues such as plumbing, electrical or HVAC systems should be addressed first and most importantly. Experts say to devote the bulk of your attention and negotiation efforts to these issues and don’t worry about the smaller items. If there are no major items that need attention, then you can tackle the smaller items with the seller as part of your final negotiation.

Lastly among our Scottsdale home inspection tips, if you opt to perform any repair work yourself or oversee its completion and decide to seek a credit from the home seller at the closing of the transaction, consult your mortgage lender. You’ll want to ensure you are able to request the maximum amount of credits as per the guidelines – usually 3%-6%. Remember, if the amount is in excess of what is needed you won't receive it, the seller gets to keep it.

Remember this It’s important to know that home inspectors – as experienced and trained as they are – don’t have x-ray vision that allows them to see through walls or under floors. So remember, as thorough as their inspection of the home may be, they can’t be expected to report on items they can't visually inspect. In addition, remember that a home inspection will give you the condition in which the home is in as of the day of the inspection. While the old adage “Things change” usually applies to the everyday hustle and bustle of life, it also applies to the conditions of various home components, too.

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home inspections in the Scottsdale Home Inspections section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

When you hire a Scottsdale home inspections specialist, there are often problems that even the most knowledgeable and experienced home inspectors can’t always see. While trained professional inspectors can notice wood rot, spot weak places on a home’s roof or locate cracks in a foundation, there are some areas that can go undetected. While a home inspector often can be a super hero, he isn’t Superman. He can’t use x-ray vision to see through walls, between floor joists or inside sewer pipes. In addition, the main purpose of most Scottsdale home inspections is to uncover problems or defects that could adversely impact the value of a house or how safe it is for its occupants. While a home inspection is always a good idea and can certainly help verify the home is a good investment as well as a safe structure, there could be existing problems that may create additional issues at a later date. Let’s take a look at four areas of concern that can go undetected.

HVAC Issues

Issues in the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) of a home are among the most difficult for home inspection professionals to detect. Since running a unit to test its cooling or heating capabilities can potentially damage it in certain conditions, most inspectors don’t perform such tests. One experienced home inspector explained it this way, “I can tell if a unit isn’t working, but I don’t have time during a home inspection to determine if the system is adequate for the house they’re trying to heat or cool.” The inspector recommends that if you have concerns about the home’s HVAC system, you should have it checked by a licensed HVAC specialist, in addition to your home inspection.

Water Leaks or Damage

Scottsdale home inspections will include checking pipes for water leaks.

A home inspector will, of course, turn on faucets to test pipes, water pressure and other issues. However, if a house has been vacant for any extended length of time, previous evidence of water leaks or damage has likely dried up. It may take several days for the leaks to return. In addition, damage to ceilings or walls could have been covered up with paint or wallpaper, making them nearly impossible to detect.

Furthermore, if the house has a leaky roof, chances are even the most experienced home inspector may miss it. Normally, inspectors make their assessments by visually scanning the room from the ground. Rarely is there time or opportunity to climb on the roofs to further inspect them. In the event an inspector does climb atop the roof, snow, ice, fallen leaves or other debris may prevent him from determining its true condition.

Environmental Toxins

In 1978, the federal government called for a moratorium on the production and use of lead paint and asbestos-based materials used in construction. If the home you plan to purchase was built before 1978 it’s a good idea to pay to have specialized tests conducted for these environmental toxins. In addition, higher than normal radon levels can occur in any home – no matter the age. While lead paint, dangerous asbestos and radon pose potential risks, they’re not included on the list of items most Scottsdale home inspections experts look for. If you know about these environmental toxins prior to the closing of the sale, ask the seller to pay for part of the costs to remove or contain the issues. Keep in mind, the costs of removing or containing these and other toxins can be surprisingly high. For example, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the cost to professionally remove lead-based paint can run from $8 top $15 per square foot. On a 2,400 square foot home, that amounts to between $19,200 and $36,000!

Blocked or Damaged Sewer Lines

The sewer line that goes from a house to the city sewer main is the responsibility of the homeowner. It’s important, therefore, to know if there are obstructions or leaks in that sewer line. A clog or breakage could cause major issues – such as raw sewage seeping through the line or creating back ups all the way to the indoor drains.

Scottsdale home inspections usually include the type of drain pipe used in the sewer disposal and an estimate of the pipe’s age. However, it probably will not include an assessment of the structural fitness of the sewer line or its overall condition. If you’re concerned with the sewer line in the home you’re interested in buying, you can have a separate inspection done by a qualified company. They will determine if tree roots or other obstructions have adversely affected the line. A complete video sewer inspection will cost $250-$500 – compared to a total sewer line replacement, which can cost $25,000 or more.

Remember, an experienced, qualified professional home inspector can give you vital information about your home’s condition and potential issues to repair or keep a watchful eye on. However, the unknown factors are the hidden potential problems that lurk “behind the scene” that an inspector cannot see or may not be able to detect. If you’re really interested in a particular home you want to buy, a home inspection is an expense that will likely more than pay for itself – either in actual savings before problems occur, or in the peace of mind in knowing the house is free of major issues. In addition, spending the extra money to have some of the above-mentioned tests and inspections performed may also save money and headaches down the road. Remember the old adage:  "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." That certainly applies to a large purchase like a home. Knowing what issues you may be faced with in the future will save time, money and aggravation – and just may mean the difference in making buying your dream home a living nightmare.

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home inspections in the Scottsdale Home Inspections section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.