Scottsdale home improvement ideas usually are reserved for homeowners who want to make their homes bigger, more attractive or more modern. However, many home improvement steps can be taken to prepare your home when it comes time to sell. If you’ve made the decision to sell your home, it’s not just a good idea – sometimes it’s a necessity – to make your home as attractive and presentable as possible for prospective buyers. Here’s how.

Be Ready to Hit the Market Running Listing your home for sale isn’t a decision to be made lightly. In addition, putting your home on the market before you’re ready or it’s ready can severely hamper your ability to sell it for its full value. Make sure you prepare your home for the real estate marketplace. Follow these Scottsdale home improvement ideas and make the best impression you can for potential buyers to sell your home quickly and for the best price.

Scottsdale home improvement ideas include de-cluttering the house in preparation for selling it.

Clean and Declutter Your Home While it may sound cliche’ to some, we can’t emphasize enough how important it is to make sure your home is clean and free from unsightly clutter. Follow these steps and you’ll be glad you did when you receive an offer that’s at or near your full asking price.

  • Remove as much clutter as possible before you start to clean. There's no better time to get rid of unwanted items and things you’re just tired of staring at each day (we’re talking about objects, not family members!) You can donate unneeded items to a local charity, or have a yard sale if you have larger items. In addition, recycling companies are usually more than happy to come pick up large metal items – often at no charge.
     
  • Give your house a good deep-cleaning. While this step will take the largest investment of time, it will also yield the best results. Try to involve the entire family and assign everybody a task or two. Make sure you give necessary attention to the bathrooms and kitchen – lots of women who will ultimately make the decision on the house purchase will be looking them over closely. Lastly, clean the inside and the outside of your home’s windows. You’ll be surprised how it will make your home sparkle – and buyers will notice!
     
  • Take the time to organize your closets, cabinets and drawers. Don't just stuff them with things you want to get out of the way. You’ll be surprised at how many prospective buyers will open cabinets and closets so they can get an idea of the amount of storage space they contain. Clean, organized cabinets, drawers and closets will give the buyers the impression that you take care of the home – which may translate into a feeling that the rest of the home and its systems are well-maintained, too.

Make Do-it-Yourself Repairs One of the next Scottsdale home improvement ideas – and possibly one of the least expensive – is to perform various repairs to your home you can take care of all by yourself with a little time and know-how.

  • Fix leaky faucets and running toilets
  • Replace the caulking around showers, tubs and sinks
  • Repair or replace grout, if necessary
  • Repair cracks, stains, or nail holes in walls and repaint them in a neutral color
  • Fix cracked, broken or discolored windows
  • Replace or repair damaged or missing window screens
  • Replace burned-out light bulbs or fluorescent tubes

Improve Your Home’s Curb Appeal The old adage, “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression” is never truer than when you’re showing your home to prospective purchasers. If they don’t like what they see in exterior photos online or in person, chances are they may not look further. And, if your home’s curb appeal is just “average,” most buyers may adopt the feeling the rest of the home is “average,” as well. You want to “wow” your buyers. Make them love what they see on the outside and they will look forward to seeing the rest of the house. Consider these “spruce-up” tips for your home’s outside, too.

  • Trim the bushes, shrubs and trees in your yard
  • Fix broken downspouts and gutters
  • Apply new mulch as needed to give your planted areas a fresh, clean look
  • Clean and repair concrete or stone areas such as driveways and walkways. Pay close attention to oil stains and weeds or grass growing through the cracks.
  • Add some flowers to give your lawn and garden a little more color. Add a new doormat to your doorstep or front porch area. Ensure that the house numbers are clean and easy to see.

As you can see, with a relatively small amount of time, attention and expense to your home, these and a few of your own Scottsdale home improvement ideas will help you give it a renewed appearance – making it more attractive inside and out to prospective home shoppers.

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home improvement ideas in the Scottsdale Home Improvements section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

The Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook this spring is creating a sense of urgency on the part of prospective home purchasers. With interest rates having edged up slightly and home prices rising continuously, many borrowers are making a beeline to apply for home loans. Their rationale is the sooner they act, the more they potentially will save – on interest rate charges and home price increases.

Interestingly, home purchasers are electing to take out adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) in unusually high numbers in hopes they can handle the Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook of potentially higher rates and save money on their mortgage payments in the first few years.

 The latest Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook has caused some prospective home buyers and borrowers to apply for home loans before rates go even higher.

Mortgage activity has been on the rise in recent weeks, having increased nearly 3.5% from one week to the next, based on the most recent report from the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA.) Despite the week over week increase, total mortgage volume is roughly 18% lower than it was during the same period in 2016. Experts say the lower volume has more to do with the decrease in the number of refinance applications than it does with the Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook. While most borrowers refinanced a year ago when interest rates were at or near record lows, there is still some refinance activity in the mortgage marketplace. The volume of refinance loans is down 34% so far this year, but mortgage lenders have seen an increase of more than 5% in recent weeks – based on consumer fears that the Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook might include higher interest rates moving forward.

Some analysts attribute the rush to refinance to recent remarks made by key Federal Reserve officials indicating what wound up being another interest rate increase in March. In addition, other economic factors came into play such as the recent Gross Domestic Product (GDP,) manufacturing results and inflation projections. While mortgage interest rates really are not directly tied to federal funds rates – upward or downward – a rate increase by the Federal Reserve could still make mortgage interest rates increase, only time will tell on this for sure. Fed funds rates are generally more short-term in nature, while mortgage rates are longer term, of course.

How will the Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook impact the usually brisk spring real estate sales season? While the true impact remains to be seen, economists say demand on the part of home buyers is still high. The problem, they contend – which is of greater concern than the prospect of higher interest rates – is affordable homes are still in short supply. The inventory shortages that occurred during much of 2016 have carried over into 2017, and don’t appear to be improving anytime soon. Since a good portion of the housing demand is on the part of millennials and first-time buyers, the inventory shortage is of major concern.

As mentioned above, one of the results of the recent Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook is more buyers are opting for adjustable rate mortgage solutions in an effort to save money since the ARMs offer lower interest rates for a certain time period. Statistics reported by the MBA showed that the ARM share of recent mortgage lending applications was the highest since 2014. The results simply highlight the concern borrowers have for higher interest rates, and in spite of the indications, home demand remains high going into the spring. In addition to the ARM share of applications reaching a three-year high, the average loan size for applications to purchase homes reached a high of $313,000. This is the result of two different factors. First-time buyers tend to impact the higher mortgage amounts less than buyers in the market who are moving up and buying bigger, newer and more expensive homes.

The Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook may have a definite impact on the spring market, however, all early indications are that due to high demand and the overall impression that interest rates – despite their slight upward tick in recent months – are still relatively low. Many borrowers remember when interest rates were in the 8%-9% range for a number of years. With that in mind, rates roughly 50% as high are veritable bargains today – in spite of the higher home prices that exist in today’s real estate market.

More first-time borrowers are going to faced with the dilemma of continuing to pay higher rents versus putting their monthly payments into paying a mortgage and building equity in a home of their own. The home participation or home ownership rate reached an all-time low in 2016, but the trend seems to be one of slight improvement during 2017. Time, as usual, will tell as first-timers decide what to do and when to do it. Housing inventory, as already cited, will determine a great deal as the market needs starter homes and more affordably priced houses to meet the demands of some of the first-time home buyers. In addition, there needs to be a larger supply of “move-up” homes for that segment of the buying public that’s ready to expand into a larger home, a better neighborhood or a newer home.

You can find more articles pertaining to the Scottsdale mortgage rate outlook in the "Scottsdale Mortgage Info" section of articles just below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. Remember to also check us out by finding us on Facebook and following us on Twitter..

Scottsdale home buying strategies can be vital as you enter the market this spring in search of a new home. While a home search is always an exciting and challenging one, in what is currently a sellers’ market, it can be especially daunting. Chances are pretty good that a seller will have his choice of buyers and offers from which to choose. That makes it a little more difficult in the event you find “the” home that’s right for you and your family. If you’ve bought a home before, you know the feeling. You’ve searched high and low and visited numerous open houses and finally found that “just right” home that meets all your needs – and is perfect for your budget, too. But, what happens if the seller isn’t as excited about you or your offer as you’d like for him to be? Then what? Let’s look at five Scottsdale home buying strategies that may help you deal with a seller who doesn't necessarily like you or your offer for his home.

Here are some of our recommended Scottsdale home buying strategies

First, remember a seller can refuse a prospective buyer for any reason. While it’s unusual for people selling their homes to be finicky or fickle, it’s not unheard of. Plus, as mentioned above, in a sellers’ market they may be able to afford to be a little more stubborn when it comes to the sales price, the terms, any contingencies, or the closing and move-out date.

Consider these tips in working with a seller in that position:

Hit Them With Your Best Shot.  No, not literally, even though it may be tempting, we’re not advocating violence! What we’re suggesting is that if you submit an offer and suffer through the back-and-forth of counter offers, it could be time to stop playing games and wasting time. Cat and mouse can be fun and challenging, but we're talking about a home here. If you like the home and want it, make your very best offer. At that point – win or lose – you’ve done all you can do – and now the proverbial ball is in the seller’s court to accept or reject your best deal. While they may reject your offer and hold out for a better one from another potential purchaser, sometimes they may rethink your offer a few weeks later.

Keep on Keeping on.  Another of our recommended Scottsdale home buying strategies is to “cut your losses and move on.” While doing so is difficult and often heart-wrenching, sometimes it’s necessary. If the seller isn't open to working with you or negotiating, it could be time to throw in the towel and move on to the next listing. Wasting time, talent, energy and desire on wanting the seller to see the deal the same way you do may mean you’ll lose out on the next “perfect’ home out there – and trust us, there’s always another one waiting.

Live and Learn.  The best coaches in the country – no matter the sport or the level of competition – will say, "…other than preparation and execution, learning from mistakes in competition is very important for the next game." So, when things don’t go exactly as you planned, take a little time to try to figure out what went wrong – and learn from it for the next negotiation on the next house. The more you understand about what worked and didn’t work, the more likely your next transaction will be more successful. Just like most things in life, it’s critical to live and learn.

Don’t Overthink This.  While you’re performing your analysis on the experience you’ve had in negotiating with or trying to work with a seller in buying their home, be careful not to overthink the seller. As is the case with most people – even close friends and family – nobody really knows what goes on inside a seller’s head. Maybe they’re not really ready to let go of their home. Maybe they’re holding out for every single dollar they can squeeze out of the deal. Perhaps they aren't prepared to move and are dragging their feet in an effort to buy time. Whatever the reason, don’t waste precious time trying to figure out the seller and his motivations or desires. Move on to the next property and concentrate on it.

Self-Analysis Can be Healthy.  Scottsdale home buying strategies can be useful – but only if you use them to your advantage and to accomplish your necessary goals. So, remember this: If you keep trying to work with sellers that refuse to cooperate, maybe you’re the problem, not them. Identify a seller who is both motivated and serious about selling his home. Work with them and make the best deal you can. Don’t waste time pining over the “one that got away,” as there are other fish in the sea. Keeping a positive attitude and a feeling of optimism in the face of rejection or disappointment may mean the difference between finding the right home and becoming frustrated. Stay positive and get what you want.

Read more about home buying advice in the section of articles on Scottsdale Home Buying Tips just below our Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

Remember, we also post tips daily on Facebook and Twitter. Check us out there, too.

Scottsdale real estate news trends seem to indicate an increasing number of Americans in search of the proverbial American Dream of home ownership may not be able to experience it. In a nutshell, they either can’t afford the prices of new homes or are unable to save money for a down payment.

Recent statistical models show prospective home buyers at various household income levels are likely to experience sticker shock when shopping for a home this spring. Finding a home in their affordable price range is expected to be a challenging task for many.

Recent Scottsdale real estate news trends indicate an ever-growing number of Americans may not be able to buy a home.

Home prices throughout much of the nation have risen by as much as 40% during the past five years. Conversely, incomes have increased roughly half that pace, therefore, creating a chasm between price and affordability. First-time buyers and those in the lower-tiered household income range will face significant competition for the listings they may be able to afford. In addition, higher interest rates may also dampen their ability to afford many homes on the market. If interest rates continue to rise, potential home buyers and borrowers on the qualification borderline may be unable to qualify for mortgage financing.

An even more disheartening twist in the Scottsdale real estate news trends is the feeling among some housing experts that lack of available credit is a bigger problem than what interest rates do or don’t do. In the words of one housing economist, there appears to be two completely separate housing markets today: One for higher-income purchasers that seems to be brisk and successful, and one for affordable housing units that’s stagnant and struggling.

Lack of growth in the category of starter homes is cited as one reason first-time home buyers, such as millennials, have been slower then previous generations to buy their first home. Incomes just haven’t kept pace with home price increases, making it difficult for middle-class income borrowers from attaining home ownership.

As has been mentioned numerous times in Scottsdale real estate news trends, the inventory of available – and affordable – homes is in short supply. Due to this tight supply, those homes that are on the market are likely priced higher than they ordinarily would be, creating a seller’s market – what typically occurs when the supply doesn't equal demand. In this case, even the lesser priced homes may be out of reach for many prospective purchasers.

The Down Payment Dilemma
To make matters worse for some, saving money for a sufficient down payment is also a challenge that’s a direct result of two factors: 1) Not earning enough money to be able to save and, 2) As home prices continue to rise, so do rents for the first-time homeowners waiting for the right time to buy.

A 20% down payment on the median-priced home of $192,500 in the U.S. currently is roughly $38,500 based on a recent Zillow report. Compounding the problem, in parts of the country where incomes are higher and prospective homeowners are able to save money, the real estate prices in those areas are more expensive, too – making it the typical "catch 22" scenario when it comes to affording a home.

Despite mortgage loan programs requiring considerably less than the widely-accepted 20% down payment – some as little as 3.5% – first-time borrowers are finding those loans are available at higher interest rates and they require the addition of private mortgage insurance (PMI.) PMI insurance is a type of mortgage protection insurance insuring the lending institution against the borrower defaulting on the mortgage payments. The premiums on PMI can be rather steep – especially on top of an already-high loan amount and resulting monthly mortgage payment.

To combat against the higher cost of financing more and putting less of a down payment, many first-time home buyers are tapping into other assets to make the American Dream a reality. Scottsdale real estate news trends are seeing some prospective first-timers withdrawing money from their 401(k) accounts, while others are relying on loans or gifts from parents to provide the necessary 20% to avoid PMI – and the monthly escrow of taxes and insurance payments required for loans with higher loan-to-value (LTV) ratios such as these. Typically, lending institutions who finance more than 80% of the appraised value of a home will require the borrowers to pay the monthly pro-rated portion of the real estate property taxes and the homeowners insurance premium into an escrow account. When the taxes and insurance premiums are due and payable, the lending institution then pays those amounts out of the borrower’s escrow funds and the process starts all over again for the next year.

While the short-term solution may be to increase the number of affordable homes on the market, unfortunately that process takes a while. New home construction, while brisk in some markets, still lags behind demand. In addition, home builders are commanding top dollar for new homes, forcing purchasers to sell their existing ones for as much equity as possible.

It’s a cycle worth continuing to follow as part of the Scottsdale real estate news trends – not only here in Scottsdale , but throughout the nation in coming months.

See more articles pertaining to the most current Scottsdale real estate news trends in the section of articles on Scottsdale Real Estate News just below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. And remember, we also post tips daily on Facebook and Twitter. Check us out there as well.

If you’re selling your home or contemplating doing so, there are some Scottsdale home selling issues to consider. While to ultimate goal of any real estate transaction is for complete satisfaction for every party involved – from the buyer to the agent to the seller to the lender – sometimes it just doesn’t work out that way. What happens if – prior to the close of the sale – somebody gets cold feet, buyer’s remorse, or the seller has second thoughts? As the seller, how can you get out of the sales transaction without making too many waves? Can you?

Scottsdale home selling issues that can end up killing a deal

More often than not, deals that progress to the contract stage usually close without a major hitch. However, sometimes there are Scottsdale home selling issues that can kill the deal or put a bad enough taste in the mouth of the seller that he changes his mind. And, you can back out of the transaction as long as you have the proper contract contingencies along with ample communication with your real estate agent – but you need to be vigilant and don’t wait too long.

One key to backing out of the contract is to work with an experienced real estate professional. Make sure you and your agent are both on the same page when it comes to issues like the sales price, closing date, contingencies and negotiable items such as who’s paying closing costs or other seller concessions.

By keeping the lines of communication open with your real estate agent and consulting with him or her during every part of the home selling process, sellers are more informed – and better equipped, perhaps – to anticipate items that may arise regarding their home and what prospective buyers may want to negotiate.

If you’re readying your house for the market, or if it’s early in the home-selling process, an open and honest discussion with your real estate professional may save you time and trouble. Sit down with your agent and explain that you’re not ready, you’re having second thoughts, or you want to put the process on the back burner temporarily. A good, experienced agent will usually be very receptive as to how you feel – honestly, nobody wants to go through the agony of trying to sell a home only to have the seller change his mind down the road. Bring up any Scottsdale home selling issues now and avoid the awkward and painful repercussions that may occur at a later date.

If you’re a little farther into the process or if you’ve already signed the contract to sell your home, backing out of that deal can be a little more involved, but not impossible. Let’s look at your best available options for escaping the contract without creating too much damage:

Issues with the Appraisal or Home Inspection
Normally, sales contracts carry with them a contingency whereby the prospective purchaser (as well as the mortgage lender) be satisfied with the appraisal of the home and the findings of the home inspection report. Depending on the results of either, further negotiations could result between the buyer and the seller.

In the current "seller's market" situation, it’s not unusual for an appraisal to come back lower than the agreed-upon sales price. In that case, additional negotiations and discussions must occur between each party to remedy the situation. Usually, its pretty simple: Either the seller agrees to lower his price or the buyer agrees to pay more money than what the appraisal was. Of course, a third alternative is that both parties walk away from the contract based on the contingency mentioned above.

The same situation can occur with a home inspection – another of the Scottsdale home selling issues that could arise threatening a deal to fall apart. If certain problems were discovered during the routine inspection, the buyer may be more concerned – especially if the seller isn’t willing to pay to make the necessary repairs prior to the closing of the sale. The end result is that both parties – again, due to the contingency – will agree to back out of the contract.

The “Kick-Out” Stipulation
As with the contingencies mentioned above, it’s also normal for a typical contract of sale to include a contingency that says if the potential buyer can’t sell his current home, he’s not obligated to close on the new home. Some contracts may also include a contingency whereby the seller finds a new home by a certain date to ensure he has a place to move. If either scenario doesn’t occur, then either party can exercise the “kick-out” clause in the contract – enabling them to back out of the contract based on the contingency not being met.

Back Out as Early as Possible
As soon as you are made aware of Scottsdale home selling issues that may trigger your desire to back out of the contract – act fast. Real estate experts say the worst thing you can do is wait. Typically, the buyer has more options when it comes to backing out of the contract than does the seller. When the seller wants to back out, the sooner he acts, the better off he will be. Waiting too long could mean you’re setting yourself up for a breach of contract – especially if there’s a third party involved who’s entered into a contract with the buyer or the seller for an additional purchase or sale.

See more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home selling issues in the two sections of articles on Scottsdale Home Selling Tips and Scottsdale Homes for Sale just below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

Remember, we also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook. Check us out there, too.