The Scottsdale mortgage forecast – at least for the near future – is that home loans will continue to be easier to obtain than anytime in the last ten years. The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) recently published a report showing data that seems to suggest mortgage lenders have relaxed many of their lending regulations and standards for every type of loan – including FHA and USDA home loans – both backed by the U.S. government.

Between 2008 and 2016, it was estimated credit availability to take out mortgages tightened by close to 90%, according to an MBA report. However, today’s Scottsdale mortgage forecast is brighter than before, and more people are qualifying for loans than in the last decade. Officials say even those borrowers who may have been turned down for a mortgage loan a year or more ago are likely to be granted financing in today’s lending environment.

 The Scottsdale mortgage forecast is for mortgages to become easier to obtain than in the last 10 years.

Let’s Look at the Numbers The MBA publishes its Mortgage Availability Index (MCAI) every month in an effort to show the current mortgage lending market as a single number. The MBA obtains data from over 95 lenders nationwide, looking at loan-to-value ratios, FICO credit scores and lending limits as a measure of how much or little flexibility there are in loan guidelines.

The most recent report shows the MCAI at a fairly high 177.1 – a huge increase from what many term its benchmark index of March 2012 of 100. What this means is that mortgages are almost twice as easy to obtain as they were just five short years ago.

The Scottsdale mortgage forecast is for relaxed lending standards to not only continue to be a part of a mortgage lender’s loan guidelines, but they’re making an impact in other areas as well. Mortgage software company Ellie Mae just released a report showing mortgage lenders approve 77% of applicants – an increase of 6% in roughly 18 months. In addition, the MCAI rose 1.1% in only one month. The report also showed that lenders have relaxed lending requirements for loans above the national conforming loan maximum of $424,100.

Availability, as a result, has increased for nearly every type of loan offered:

  • Government mortgage availability rose 0.2% from the prior month
  • Conventional mortgage loan availability was up 2.3% from the previous month
  • Jumbo mortgage availability increased 4.7% from the prior month

Government mortgages referenced above include the three major lending programs – the FHA loan, the VA loan and the USDA mortgage.

USDA Loans Increase Government Mortgage Availability

First-time home buyers really like the little-known USDA home loan program. USDA loans require no down payment, one of only two loan products with that feature – the other being the VA loan – which is available to current or previous members of the Armed Forces. USDA loans are also known as Rural Housing Loans and eligibility requirements are based on the home’s location. Primarily, neighborhoods throughout the U.S. that are in less densely populated areas are the easiest in which to qualify. Before you assume these programs are available only to homes located “in the boonies,” consider this – the eligibility maps are 17 years old. In many areas, was characterized as “rural” in 2000 could be part of suburbia today. The Scottsdale mortgage forecast will continue to be impacted by USDA loans.

The Housing Market Remains Safe

Mention the increased availability of mortgage credit and some people immediately equate that with concern for another housing market crash. In their minds, the logic is easy mortgage availability was responsible for the housing crisis back in 2008 and 2009 – so, if credit becomes easy to obtain we are likely to repeat history. However, here’s something that may calm your fears. Remember the Mortgage Banker’s Association (MBA) MCAI index report discussed earlier? The MBA estimates it reached close to 900 during the bubble in late 2006. Again, the index today is just 177.1. Industry experts say the Scottsdale mortgage forecast is for credit availability to remain strong – and safe – because the housing market is a different animal than it was over a decade ago. Lenders are less likely to be as lax as they were in the years leading up to the housing crisis.

Lastly, mortgage lenders today are more cognizant that making good, sound mortgage loans is the foundation of the housing industry. There are more safeguards in place to prevent history from repeating itself than ever before – primarily as a result of the housing crash. Borrowers today need to have good credit – not excellent, blemish-free credit reports – but a history of paying their monthly obligations on time, over time. In addition, they need sufficient income to qualify for the monthly payments. Of course, they need to have a sufficient down payment to qualify for most mortgage loans, though not all.

Simply put, we remain optimistic with the Scottsdale mortgage forecast for 2017 and beyond. Here’s hoping the housing market will continue to recover to its full capacity.

You can find more articles pertaining to the Scottsdale mortgage forecast in the "Scottsdale Mortgage Info" section of articles just below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. Remember to also check us out by finding us on Facebook and following us on Twitter.

We’ve assembled a Scottsdale home buying checklist for people thinking of entering the real estate market, looking to buy a house. Let’s take a look at these seven important tips.

1 – Home buying should be for the long haul. Not too long ago, buying houses and turning around and selling them (or “flipping” them) was a popular way to make money. Today, we recommend considering planning to live in the home you buy for at least 7-10 years. Of course, there’s no hard and fast rule. People move where their jobs take them – whether it’s across town or across the country – but give consideration to whether you’ll likely move within the next few years before you decide to buy. For some people, it may be better to rent for a few years.

2 – Do some soul-searching before you decide to buy. Your Scottsdale home buying checklist should include asking yourself a series of tough questions to make sure your heart is in what you’re about to undertake. Buying a home is the single largest purchase most people will make in their lifetime – make sure you recognize that, and treat it importantly.

Scottsdale home buying checklist for prospective purchasers thinking about buying a house.

3 – Ask yourself these questions: Will you choose to start a family soon? Do your needs require a home with a large yard for a growing family or your pet(s)? How do you feel about yard work? Do you like the city better than the suburbs?

4 – Take your time before you buy. Most people tend to jump right into to the home buying pool without testing the water first. Take your time. There’s no hurry. While interest rates are fairly low, the temptation may be to act quickly, but experts say the rates are expected to remain fairly affordable throughout 2017. Use the extra time you allot to make sure your credit score is in the best shape possible and that the other items you’ll need for loan qualification are in order (tax returns if you’re self-employed, source and verification of your down payment, etc.)

5 – Buy within your budget. One of the most important items on your Scottsdale home buying checklist should be to focus on what you can comfortably afford. Remember, mortgage lenders will use your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) to determine whether you qualify for home loan financing. Before you start the home shopping journey, take a look at your DTI. Take the total of all your recurring debt including your proposed monthly mortgage payment (PITI) along with other monthly debt like credit cards and car payments. Divide that total by your gross monthly income. Most mortgage lending experts say your DTI should be 36% or lower. The most important thing to remember is this: Take out the loan and the monthly payment you can comfortably afford, not necessarily the one you qualify for. Making a higher monthly mortgage payment is no fun if you can’t afford to buy steaks for the new backyard grill occasionally. Some experts recommend buying a home you can afford based on one income. That way, should you or your spouse lose their job or get laid off – or elects to become a full-time parent – you can still comfortably pay for your home.

6 – Consider the tax advantages. The tax benefits are a big part of any Scottsdale home buying checklist. Currently, the mortgage interest you pay on a primary residence is tax deductible. So, the tax savings are of huge consequence since you can deduct your home loan interest and your real estate taxes from your gross income. For example, if you earned $75,000 in gross income in 2016 and you paid $10,000 in mortgage interest and your property taxes were $2,000, you could lower your taxable income to $63,000 – saving you a bundle on income tax.

7 – Create a moving account. Another important item on your Scottsdale home buying checklist is to start a move-in fund. Of course, you’ll have to have a down payment, but don’t forget other things like closing costs, moving expenses and other necessities for your new home. If you’ve been renting, for example, you may need to purchase a lawnmower and other lawn care equipment – along with that backyard grill!

8 – You may choose to rent, if you’re not ready to buy. Let’s face it…sometimes it’s not a good idea to buy. Maybe after you review your Scottsdale home buying checklist you’ll realize it’s not the right time. If you’re not ready, don't force it. Rent instead. You’ll be happier, healthier and financially wiser to put it off a year or two until you feel more comfortable. Save your money. Find a better job. Get your finances in order. Do your homework. Then when you’re ready to buy you’ll be that much more prepared.

Read more about home buying advice in the section of articles on Scottsdale Home Buying Tips just below our Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

Remember, we also post tips daily on Facebook and Twitter. Check us out there, too.

This Scottsdale tax update involves a number of changes to take into consideration before filing your 2016 income tax returns. And despite the changes, overall there aren't too many variations in the preparation of your 2016 income tax returns compared to 2015. However, there are a few important considerations for you to take note of to make sure you're filing as accurately and efficiently as possible this year – especially if you're planning to get a tax refund.

One important Scottsdale tax update of which to be aware is that taxpayers will have three extra days to file their returns this year. April 15th falls on a Saturday, and when that occurs the tax deadline is extended to the next business day, ordinarily Monday, April 17th. However, April 17th is the day the District of Columbia recognizes Emancipation Day. So the tax deadline will be Tuesday, April 18th.

The various tax deductions and filing rules are essentially the same as last year. The difference will be in the tax brackets, which were adjusted for inflation. So, as one CPA put it, don't necessarily assume that what you did last year can be relied on this year. Consult the tax tables carefully.

This Scottsdale tax update addresses several changes to be aware of.

This Scottsdale tax update addresses several changes to be aware of.

The mileage rate is lower. Tax regulations allow for tax advantages for using your personal vehicle for business, charitable, moving or medical purposes. You are able to deduct the actual costs involved, or use the mileage rate as prescribed by the IRS, whichever is greater. For 2016, the rate for business mileage is 54 cents per mile, 3.5 cents lower than it was in 2015. For medical or moving expenses, the rate is 19 cents per mile, down from 23 cents in 2015. The mileage rate for charitable purposes remains the same at 14 cents per mile.

There could be a delay in receiving your refund. If you are claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit, expect your refund to be delayed in order to give the IRS more time to investigate errors and fraud in claiming these credits. Blame the delay on a new law, Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes, passed in 2015.

If you need help from the IRS, you will need an appointment. The IRS taxpayer assistance centers no longer accept walk-ins. Simply call in advance to make an appointment and help will be available.

Your income tax bracket may have changed. Income levels for all tax rates have been adjusted slightly to reflect the results of inflation. Consult the new tax tables.

Your personal exemption has been raised. In 2016, the personal exemption has been increased from $4,000 to $4,050. For taxpayers with an adjusted gross income of $259,400 for single filers and $311,300 for a married couple filing jointly, the exemption is less. The exemption is not available for taxpayers with an adjusted gross income of $381,900 filing as a single taxpayer and $433,800 for couples filing jointly.

You may get a larger Earned Income Tax Credit. Another Scottsdale tax update is for taxpayers who have three or more children. The maximum credit for their 2016 income tax returns is $6,269, compared to $6,242 in 2015. The formula for the tax credit includes several factors, including income and the number of dependents.

You'll pay a larger penalty if you weren't covered by health insurance. If you don’t have health insurance, you’re going to be penalized – again – to the tune of $695 per adult and $347.50 for each minor child. Good news, though… the maximum household penalty is $2,085. Still, according to IRS officials, most families won’t actually owe the IRS any money, thanks to over 30 existing exemptions already in place.

If you won money in the Olympics or Paralympics, you may not have to pay taxes on the winnings. Normally, if you win money or prizes in a contest or a lottery, you have to pay taxes on those winnings. If your adjusted gross income is less than $1 million ($500,000 if married filing separately) you won’t have to pay taxes on your winnings from the Olympics or Paralympics. Thank Congress for a new law that was passed last year.

If you owe enough back taxes, you may lose your passport. The U.S. State Department now has the right to revoke your passport if you owe more than $50,000 in unpaid taxes. This is due to a 2015 transportation regulation called the FAST Act. Insiders say the IRS so far hasn’t provided back taxes information to the State Department, but expects to do so later this year. So, if you plan to travel abroad in the future, you better make sure you’ve paid your taxes.

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale taxes in the Taxes section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right.

We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

During a Scottsdale home inspection, it’s not unusual for issues to arise which need repair or replacing. Many times, it can mean a return to the negotiating table so the buyer and seller can hammer out the details of who’s going to fix what – or how much of a credit the seller is planning to give the buyer. When a home inspection discovers items needing to be addressed, consider these three tips to negotiate repairs.

Ask the seller to give you a credit for the cost of the work to be performed. There are several reasons for asking for a credit rather than having the seller have the required work done. First and foremost, the seller has likely lost interest in performing work on the home, regardless of the findings of your Scottsdale home inspection. After all, the contract is signed and even though there are issues pending that need to be negotiated, most sellers are too focused on buying and moving into their next home. Secondly, if you can get the seller to give you a credit against the sales price you can use that additional savings to have the work done yourself – with you being the new homeowner and with the work being done to your satisfaction. Thirdly, with a credit at closing the issue of repairing or replacing certain items falls squarely on your shoulders, keeping it simple and not involving the seller to ensure the work was being done.

Keep these items in mind as you prepare to negotiate after your XXX home inspection report.

Consider long-range planning. Keep future repairs or renovations in mind when negotiating with the seller. For example, if there are water stains on the ceiling that occurred as a result of a leak, ask the seller for a credit to repair both the leak and repainting or repairing the ceiling. You may elect to repair the leak, but put off fixing the stain until later – especially if you know you’re going to replace the existing stippled ceilings with a smoother treatment. Keep those and other items in mind as you prepare to negotiate on the heels of your Scottsdale home inspection report.

Don’t let others “see your hand.” In a card game, it’s important not to let others see your cards because it will give them an unfair advantage and change the way they play the game. Use the same strategy during your Scottsdale home inspection. If you say too much to the listing agent about your likes and dislikes or about your plans for decorating certain rooms and how excited you are, you could lose your negotiating power. The listing agent may tell the seller, and it could affect the outcome of the credit they were thinking about giving you. For example, if you tell the listing agent you plan to completely re-do the entire kitchen, the seller may find out about it and be less inclined to give you a credit for repairing the kitchen cabinets or replacing a dishwasher. Don’t reveal your plans. Keep a “poker face.”

It’s probably good to mention here that you should always insist the sales contract be contingent on the home “passing inspection” by way of a Scottsdale home inspection report showing no discernible repairs that should be made. If you don't include that in the contract and make the assumption you can always come back and revisit or negotiate certain issues after the inspection, you may be unpleasantly surprised.

In the event the property inspection is completed without any mention of needed repairs or other shortcomings, that's good. There’s no reason for further negotiating. However, if there are items that need to be addressed and the contract doesn’t mention what to do in such a case, you’ve lost your negotiating power and may force the seller to consider other offers or back-up contracts if you elect not to move forward.

With that in mind, enter into the closing with a full awareness of what can happen. In the sports world the old saying, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over” means anything can happen while the game is still going on. It’s the same in the real estate world – a deal isn’t completed until the money goes from the buyer to the seller and the deed to the property is transferred properly. The lesson here is: “Be alert, stay on your toes and keep your eyes wide open.” Anything less than that and you run the risk of losing your negotiating advantage and making your home buying experience less than what it could be.

Don’t give “buyer’s remorse” any opportunity to enter the picture. Be happy and satisfied with your purchase. You’ll enjoy it that much more!

You can find more articles pertaining to Scottsdale home inspections in the Scottsdale Home Inspections section of our site below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. We also post tips daily on Twitter and Facebook and would love for you to follow us there as well.

Making the Scottsdale real estate news outlook is the recent policy from the Trump administration that it had reversed one of the eleventh hour decisions made by the outgoing Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The reversal involved the reinstatement of a cut in the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) annual insurance premium. The new administration stated the need to take a closer look at the premium reduction, saying the cut will increase the risk that U.S. taxpayers take on should there be a housing crisis like the one we saw nearly a decade ago. Detractors against the administration’s move say the FHA’s insurance fund is substantial and is positioned to provided mortgage borrowers a benefit by way of the premium reduction.

FHA borrowers usually are those who are the least flush with cash. As a result, the FHA program is tailor-made for homebuyers who are unable to afford more than a modest down payment – requiring the FHA’s mortgage insurance. With a qualifying FHA loan, a borrower can put down as little as 3.5%. Conventional lenders also offer low down payment lending programs requiring private mortgage insurance (PMI) and generally higher FICO credit scores than their FHA counterparts.

The Scottsdale real estate news outlook for 2017 is that it will cost you more this year than in the past.

The reversal of the premium reduction is expected to impact borrowers who already may be on the borderline of being able to qualify. The higher monthly payments created by not having the insurance premium cut will equate to approximately a .375% rate increase for prospective borrowers seeking FHA loans. That, coupled with the recent rise in interest rates after the presidential election will mean that the cost of buying a house – for many people – will increase slightly during the early spring of 2017.

In the Scottsdale real estate news outlook, while interest rates spiked as a result of the stock market’s rise post-election, they seem to have settled somewhat during the holidays – only to slightly rise again in recent weeks. While economists are split on whether rates will continue to rise throughout 2017 and by how much, most seem to agree that mortgage interest rates will not exceed 4.25% during the year. If that happens, although it will signal rates of slightly more than 1.25% higher than the all-time record lows experienced in much of the previous 12-18 months, the rate will still represent a relatively low interest rate for which to pay to purchase a home.

Of more concern than interest rates is the cost of the price of a newly-constructed home. In December, the Scottsdale real estate news outlook showed that the average price of a new home increased by over 7% compared to the same month last year. The prices reflect – for the most part – increased costs builders face in two key areas: the cost of land and the availability of labor. The cost of labor and the availability of labor are items which are less likely to improve during the new administration, as much of the homebuilder workforce is comprised of immigrants. In a recent survey by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) 78% of builders cited labor as their most pressing problem – and 82% felt it would be worse in 2017.

In addition, the other factors affecting the housing market as mentioned in the Scottsdale real estate news outlook recently has been the real estate market’s continued lack of sufficient inventory. The number of homes on the market for sale will likely mean the supply won't meet the demand again this year, making for another seller’s market in many of the more popular real estate markets throughout the U.S.

Lastly, as home values continue to appreciate – possibly not as rapidly as they did during 2016 – that means the number of homes on the market for sale will be priced at a premium. Real estate experts say the average appreciation rate of homes in the nation is expected to be in the 5% range, with some markets being higher and some lower. That’s slightly lower than what occurred in the 2015-2016 real estate markets, when housing values are at rates nearing 6% in some hotbeds, while averaging nearly 5.5% nationwide.

While the jury may still be out on factors such as interest rates, it does appear that the prevalent Scottsdale real estate news outlook for 2017 is that if you’re in the market to purchase a home, it’ll cost you more this year than in the past. However, the market appears to be poised and ready for what will probably be a good year for the real estate industry. The spring selling season will soon be here, giving buyers and sellers a much better idea of what to expect for the remainder of the year.

See more articles pertaining to the most current Scottsdale real estate news outlook in the section of articles on Scottsdale Real Estate News just below Scottsdale Real Estate Categories in the column to your right. And remember, we also post tips daily on Facebook and Twitter. Check us out there as well.